classroom
Property Management
Employment Information

Employment prospects in the property management field are expected to rise by 16% between 2014-2024 in the Seattle Metropolitan area, higher than average in the nation and compared to other professions. (Source: careeronestop.org, sponsored by the US Department of Labor). Property Management is a stable career with benefits, and includes multi-disciplinary activities during the normal course of the work day. Property management generally includes an element of personal interaction with tenants, owners, and sometimes, the general public in multi-use buildings. It is an engaging and dynamic profession with multiple paths for career employment, development, and promotion.

PROPERTY MANAGERS ARE NAMED ONE OF THE 20 HAPPIEST JOBS – TIED FOR FIRST IN 2012.  THEY HAVE AN OVERALL JOB HAPPINESS INDEX OF 4.7 OUT OF 5.

-FORBES MAGAZINE

 

Wages

 

Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers:

  • • Seattle, Bellevue, Everett Metropolitan Area: $42.21/hour median wage, $87,800 annual mean wage
  • • Washington: $33.64/hour median wage, $69,690/annual mean wage
  • • National: $27.42/hour median wage
     (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  •  

Annual salaries vary with the position. Annual salaries in the Seattle Metropolitan area for some representative positions include:  

  • • Assistant Property Managers in Seattle can expect over $50,000 median income,
  • • Leasing Managers $38,000 median income,
  • • Apartment Managers $32,260 median income, and
  • • Asset Managers earn an average salary of $91,563 per year.
    (Source: www.payscale.com)

For more information on Employment Outlook, Work Environment, Work Schedules, and more, please visit the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Job Prospects

Job opportunities should be best for those with a bachelor’s degree in business administration, real estate, or a related field and for those with professional certification.

Because of the projected increase in the elderly population, particularly good job opportunities are expected for those with experience managing retirement centers, age-restricted communities, and healthcare facilities.
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Working Conditions

Most property, real estate, and community association managers work out of an office. However, many managers spend much of their time away from their desks. Onsite managers, in particular, may spend a large part of their workday visiting the building engineer, showing apartments, dealing with owners and board members, checking on the janitorial and maintenance staff, or investigating problems reported by residents. Real estate asset managers may spend time away from home while traveling to company real estate holdings or searching for properties to buy.

Property, real estate, and community association managers often must attend evening meetings with residents, property owners, community association board members, or civic groups. As a result, long workdays are common. Some apartment managers are required to live in the apartment complexes where they work, so that they are available to respond to emergencies even when they are off duty.

What does a Property Manager do?
 

find out more